6 Back to School tips for Parents of Elementary School Children

6 Back to School tips for Parents of Elementary School Children
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Over the summer vacations, parents tend to give students more freedom, especially when it comes to routines. If your student is starting a new elementary school or just a new grade, there are ways for you to mitigate the negative impact of the back-to-school rush. Slowly getting back into your routine the week before your student heads back to school will make the transition easier for everyone.

Bed times
Get back into your bedtime routines and wake your students up earlier in the morning. It may not be possible to get them out of bed at a school-worthy hour, but try to get them up before you leave for work in the morning. Getting back into the habit of going to bed on time, getting a good night’s sleep and waking up at a set time will make it much easier to get to school in the morning. Remember that your student needs 8 to 10 hours of sleep, so plan accordingly.

Breakfasts and Lunches
Discuss meal options with your students and settle on healthy meals that are easy to prepare and quick to make. Getting your students involved in the process will ensure that everyone is happy with their meal options. Have a few breakfast and lunch runs to ensure that you have enough time for everything in the morning.

Get Ready
Shop for clothing and then pack sets of clothing in piles in your child’s drawer. This means they have a full set of clothing ready to go for the first couple of mornings. You can get into the habit of stacking outfits together so that your student can just grab a pile and get dressed in the morning without having to find a missing sock or decide what they are going to wear.

Shop Early
Get to the shops early this year and sort out your back-to-school supplies. Pack a backpack a few days prior to the start of school. The backpack should weigh no more than 10 to 20% of your student’s weight.

Scout the Area
If your student is starting a new school, take them on a tour of the school grounds. Make sure that they know where their classroom is and how to get around school. Also go over their route from home to school and back so that they are completely comfortable on their first day.

Get Brain-Ready
In the weeks leading up to the start of school, get your students to practice their reading and math skills. Discuss your expectations for the year and brush up on school rules you think are pertinent. Go over safety concern like rules for buses, crossing the road or dealing with strangers.

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