How to Prepare for the Parent/Teacher Interview

How to Prepare for the Parent/Teacher Interview

We all expect our teachers to prepare for our parent/teacher interviews, but parents often don’t think about these meetings. If you go in unprepared, you may miss out on a vital opportunity to discuss your child’s progress and make a plan for the rest of the semester which would help your child to succeed.

Most parents see these interviews as a chore, and often get caught off guard when the feedback isn’t positive. When this happens, they tend to get defensive and want to get it over with as soon as possible. This means they miss out a chance to ask questions about their child’s progress and how any issues can be resolved. Working together with teachers is the best way to ensure that your child gets the help they need.

Be Prepared

Before your meeting, speak with your child about their progress. Ask them what their teacher has said to them and what their test scores have been like. Knowing what to expect will prepare you and will mean no nasty surprises.

Write out a list of questions you could potentially ask your teachers (some are listed below) and always try to find solutions to any problems the teacher may point out.

Don’t get Defensive

Teachers are trained professionals who get to see your children in a context that you don’t. They get to see them in class and they also get to see how they interact with other children. They will probably address both behavioral and academic issues.

Listen carefully and be respectful of their opinion even if it is upsetting to you. Ask them how to overcome any obstacles, what you can do at home to help and how you can work together as a team to improve behavior and marks.

Set realistic goals for your child that you can both work towards achieving. Ask for a follow up meeting in a month’s time so you can check progress and update your strategy.

Remember that teachers want your input and value your opinion. Their job is easier if you can work as a team so that what is happening at school is reinforced at home. They want your child to succeed as much as you do and they are open to ideas and goals that will help your child to learn.

Some Questions to Consider

  1. How can I help you to help my child?
  2. What goals can we set for the next month?
  3. How can I support my child in achieving these goals?
  4. What is my child’s learning style and how can I use this to help them study?
  5. What are my child’s strengths and weaknesses?
  6. What executive functions does my child need to improve?
  7. How can I help develop these executive functions at home?
  8. How can I track my child’s progress?
  9. How can we communicate effectively with each other?
  10. How can I help you in the classroom?
  11. Will my child benefit from a one-on-one tutor?
More Posts Like This
  • Great apps to help your children learn to code

    Learning to code is similar a learning a second language, and it is easier to acquire if exposed to at a young age. A whopping 71% of all new STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) jobs are in the computing field! There is no better time to prepare for the future. Here are some great apps that focus on coding for kids!

    Read More
  • Why your kids should consider volunteer work

    Volunteer work is a great way of giving back to your community, and also helps to foster a sense of personal self-accomplishment! Helping others actually has some surprising benefits that may not immediately come to mind when we think of volunteer work! Here are some great reasons to consider volunteering in your community.

    Read More
  • Great Educational Apps for All Ages

    At Tutor Doctor, we think technology is awesome! When it comes to “apps”, people often think of social media, entertainment, or email. Believe it or not, there are actually a ton of great educational apps that help make the learning process fun and engaging! Here are three of our top picks, which are great for students of all ages.

    Read More