Best Reading List for Fifth and Sixth Graders

Best Reading List for Fifth and Sixth Graders
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Whether your child is an avid or reluctant reader, getting them to read for pleasure is a great way to help them improve their reading and comprehension skills and knock those communication abilities right out of the park. One of the best ways to get them hooked on reading is to find books that intrigue them. Here is a list of the some really great books to try online, from your library or from your local book store.

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

This now-famous series of books is enthralling and follows the trials and tribulations of Katniss Everdeen as she inadvertently leads a rebellion against the oppressive capital in the nation of Panem. The series explores the idea of repression by the state and the courage it takes to stand up to those you are afraid of.

The Great Molasses Flood of 1919 by Deborah Kops

This sticky piece of history recounts the story of a molasses truck that exploded in Boston’s north end in 1919, sending shards of metal and molasses flying in all directions. The story chronicles the events leading up to the mishap, the great cleanup and the court case that followed.

Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo

Opal’s mum abandoned her at a young age and now she has trouble fitting in with the residents of the new town she has just moved to with her preacher dad. When she meets a scraggly stray at her local Winn-Dixie supermarket, her life changes forever. Winn-Dixie is a big ugly dog whose misadventures help Opal to connect with her community and come to terms with her loss.

Catherine, called Birdy by Karen Cushman

This medieval coming of age novel follows the story of Birdy who, in moving from childhood to womanhood, must be sold in marriage to an unwanted suitor. Through her diary entries, Birdy at first rebels against her fate, but when she finally resigns herself to it, a wonderful surprise is in store.

Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli

Jeffrey Lionel “Maniac” Magee is good at everything he does, but his life is difficult living with his aunt and uncle after both his parents die. When he can’t take living with his feuding family, he runs away to Two Mills, PA where he must settle a feud between rival gangs and deal with issues of race.

Roll of Thunder, Hear my Cry by Mildred D. Taylor

The epic tale of one family’s struggle during the depression and how they overcome racism and social injustice. This is the story of Cassie Logan who discovers why land ownership is so important in establishing the Logan family’s sense of pride and independence. This is a touching tale with important social themes.

Pic by Arrathoonlaa

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