The Stress-free Homework Guide

The Stress-free Homework Guide
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Is homework regularly an issue in your home? There are many ways to help your students to get into good homework habits without doing the work for them. If you dread homework just as much as your students do, there are ways to help make homework less stressful for everyone. Here are some tips on helping your students to do their homework on time and independently.

Set Homework Goals

Discuss with your student their goals for the rest of the semester. These can be as simple as turning in every paper on time or being more organized. Decide together on two or three goals for homework this term and write them down in a place where they are visible. Offer rewards for goals that are successfully completed.

Get Organized

Perhaps part of the ongoing problem with homework is a lack of organization. When students forget about assignments or don’t leave enough time to complete the tasks at hand, it puts a lot of strain on everyone. Help them to stay organized by starting a homework diary, or using a smart phone app to keep track of tasks and due dates or even a whiteboard where homework is written up; whatever works for you and your student.

Get into a Groove

The best way to ensure that homework is done on time is to set up a routine. Start by examining your current routine and identifying the issues that make homework a hassle. Is your student too tired because homework time is set before bedtime? Do they need a break after school before starting homework? Try to find the triggers that set off your homework problems and formulate a new routine that helps to eliminate some of the issues you are currently dealing with.

Does your Student need Help?

Sometimes part of the problem with homework is that your student feels overwhelmed and confused. We all have a propensity to put off tasks that we are intimidated by. Ask your students if they need a little extra help or speak with your teachers for advice. An in-home tutor will help your student to complete homework tasks and get a better understanding of the material.

Create the Right Environment

Where is your student doing their homework? Are they being distracted by social media, TV, music, or siblings? Create a homework station that is free from distraction, well lit, in a well-ventilated area and where your student is comfortable and has everything they need to complete the task at hand.

Don’t Be Too Helpful

Your student needs to learn to work independently, to complete tasks in the assigned times and to be organized. Learning these skills will stand them in good stead when they get to the higher grades and especially in college. While you can help with tasks that they are struggling with and you can help them to learn effective study skills and organizational skills, you should be working to minimize your role in their daily homework assignments.

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