ACT Test Preparation

ACT Test Preparation

It’s that time of year and although you may be feeling the pressure to perform well on your ACTs, you know the best course of action is to be prepared. Start getting organized and augment your study program with past tests and online test questions. If you are struggling with things you don’t understand or you want to move your score up to get into a good school, consider some ACT tutoring sessions which will help to fill in the gaps in your foundation of knowledge.

Get organized

Create a schedule that is realistic and leaves enough time for you to properly study each subject thoroughly. Don’t block off hours of study at a time. You should hit the books for about 45 minutes to an hour at a time, then schedule an activity that involves getting up from your desk. Movement is a great way to stretch out tired shoulders and it also helps to stimulate higher cognitive functioning.

Use your Downtime

Make flashcards, record lectures, or make short notes that you can review during downtime when you are waiting or commuting, between classes or when you are on a break from something else.

Study Groups

Get together with three or four other students who are going to pull their weight in the study group. Divide the text up and get each student to review a section and make notes. Then teach each other and share notes.

Learn from your mistakes

Going over past ACT exams is a must for students who want to be successful. This will help you to become familiar with the way in which questions are posed and how best to answer them. When you make mistakes on past tests, don’t erase them. Instead mark them in a colored pen and write the correct response alongside so that you can learn from your mistakes.

No distractions!

This is a tough one, but you need to find a space where there are no distractions; not even your phone! You can text and talk to your friends later; you don’t have to say no, just put them off until you have a break. Turn your phone off when you are studying to avoid distractions completely.

Find a space in your home, a neighbor’s home, the library or at school where you can work quietly without interruptions or noise from siblings or the TV. You know what works best for you, so create a space which is optimized for success. You will feel better and study faster when you are working in an environment conducive to studying.

Eat right

The temptation may be to live on candy and energy drinks, but your brain needs proper sustenance to work. When you eat junk it affects your brain’s ability to function which means all that studying is going to waste. Eat healthy balanced meals with tons of fruit and veggies and drinks lots of water. If you must go on a diet, wait until after exams because your brain needs carbs to function.

Get a great online resource for practice questions in math, reading, English, science and writing here.

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