Early Signs of Dyslexia

Blog Categories

Does your student struggle academically? If they are taking a long time to read, do their homework or keep up in class they may have dyslexia. Dyslexia is a very common learning disorder which makes it difficult for students to read, interpret words and recognize symbols. Some students may be able to read, but won’t be able to make sense of what they are reading or remember facts they have read. Other students may feel physically ill when they read with symptoms ranging from headaches to nausea.

As you can imagine, these symptoms can make it very difficult for dyslexic students to cope in a classroom situation. Luckily, there is much that can be done to overcome this learning disability. Your student’s brain is simply wired differently and once you understand how to present information in a way that makes sense to them, you will be able to help them to communicate effectively and keep up in class. Early detection means you can get your student the help they need as soon as possible. Here are some of the main telltale signs:

Late talkers: Most dyslexic students will have had a delay in learning speech. Of course they will master this eventually, but they will still mix up words or sounds and may use the wrong words in sentences. They may have speech impediments which especially affect the way they pronounce R’s, L’s, Ms and Ns.

Switching the order of numbers and letters: All children will mix up numbers and letter when they are in kindergarten or in the lower grades. But with dyslexic students this problem persists well past the first two grades. If you notice that your student is having real trouble reading, you may want to get them assessed.

Dyslexic students may also experience trouble learning the order of letters in the alphabet or being able to count correctly. They may experience trouble learning to spell correctly.

Dyslexia also affects the student’s ability to recognize symbols and numbers. This means that your student will have trouble solving rudimentary math problems.

Copying: Students who are dyslexic find it difficult to copy written text from books or from the board.

Dominance: Dyslexic students often use both hands interchangeably and take a long time to settle on a dominant side. This means that they will have trouble telling left from right and may have poor coordination. This can translate into poor handwriting too.

It can be very frustrating for you as a parent to see your student excelling in most areas, but falling behind in classes that involve reading or math. You know that they are smart, but if they just can’t seem to keep up and display signs of dyslexia, get them assessed by a developmental psychologist. Not only can they offer a diagnosis, they can also help you and your student to overcome their learning disorder and excel academically.

More Posts Like This
  • Back to School Organization Hacks to Simplify Your Life

    With back to school right around the corner, it’s a great time to get prepared! Tutor Doctor has some awesome organization hacks to simplify your life.

    Read More
  • Everything You Need to Know About the FAFSA

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, more commonly known as the FAFSA, is a valuable resource for both current and soon-to-be college students. Filling out this form is an important part of the college process, even if you don’t think you will qualify for federal aid. Here’s everything you need to know about the FAFSA!

    Read More
  • Are Your Children Too Reliant on Technology?

    Technology can be an incredibly valuable resource for students to expand their knowledge and interests. However, with modern technology all around us, it’s also easy for kids to become overly dependent on these resources – especially if they have grown up with them their entire lives. Are your children too reliant on technology?

    Read More