What to Expect in High School

What to Expect in High School
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Feeling a little intimidated about starting high school? It’s no small wonder! This is the year when every grade matters and your permanent record counts. The transition to high school is a big one and may take a couple of weeks or months to get used to. It’s really good practice for the jump from school to college life which is an even bigger change. One of the ways in which you can make a seamless transition to high school life is to learn good organizational skills.

Academic tracks

You’ve already selected the academic track you will take to realize your future career aspirations, but it’s impossible to judge how much you will enjoy a subject before you start taking it. If you find your workload is too big, it may be advisable to defer some courses until you have found your footing. It’s best to do a few things really well than many things badly. If you are feeling overwhelmed or you have trouble keeping up with or grasping material, speak with your teacher, parents or student councillor.

Dealing with academic issues early on will mean you have time to change tactics or get a tutor who can help you to stay ahead of the curve. Your teachers and parents are there to support you and help you through the transition.

Take care of yourself

With the increased academic load, it’s important to maintain a good balance in life. This is a life skill that will ensure a happier healthier you. Take time out with friends and socialize, eat well, exercise regularly and make space in your life for family time too. Getting the balance right is tricky, so speak with councillors or your parents if you are finding that you don’t seem to have enough time to fit everything in.

Be prepared

The first few weeks at high school are the hardest. You can ease the transition by getting organized before your academic year begins. Ensure that you know the basic layout of the school so that you can find all your new classes with ease. You should also be aware of how long it takes you to get from one class to another so that you can avoid being late.

Identify your support group and know which of your friends will be attending school with you, who your teachers are and which counsellors are there to help.

Join social and sports groups early on to help you to make new friends with similar interests. Getting involved will help you to feel at home.

Tour the school’s website for important information, teacher profiles and other pertinent rules and regulations that may apply to you.

High school is a fun, exciting time for you. While it may seem strange and intimidating in the beginning, you will soon get the hang of things. Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you are not coping socially or academically. You will be amazed at how helpful your fellow students, parents and councillors will be.

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