Help your Student to Love the Library

Help your Student to Love the Library
Blog Categories

Libraries are such valuable resources for students and parents alike. Their continued existence relies on the public availing themselves of these services. Not only will learning to love the library open your student to a wealth of reading and learning opportunities, but libraries also play an integral part of a student’s college career. The sooner they learn to get the most out of their school and community libraries, the better! There are ways for you to help get your student to love the library.

It’s never too early to start
Community libraries offer a wealth of fun activities for younger visitors. Activities include story times, crafts and some US libraries boast impressive Lego centers too. Toys, games and activities make the library a fun place for younger students. It’s easy to join; just take your ID down and register. The best thing about libraries is that they are free. This offers families a wealth of activities and learning opportunities without burdening them with extra costs.
Fostering a love for books and reading when students are young will give them a real edge. They not only read faster, but have improved vocabulary and communication skills. Their writing is better and they learn something new with each and every book.
Libraries also encourage a natural curiosity as students are encouraged to ask questions and can find the answers to any question at their library. Libraries foster a sense of community and help families from the same neighbourhood to connect.

Get Involved
Get your students their own library cards. When they are able to pick their own books, they are more likely to read them. If your student liked a movie, go to the library and get them the book so that they are more likely to read it. Harry Potter and the Twilight series of books have improved teen reading statistics dramatically.
You can ask your librarian for a schedule of events to ensure that you don’t miss out. Be a good role model by reading books yourself. Your regular library visits should be as important as other school activities like sports practices.
If your student is reticent to read a whole book, encourage them to try magazines. The library will have a large collection of magazines and they are sure to find something that interests them. Also suggest comic books and Manga comics as these offer a good introduction to reading. Any reading helps to improve language skills and adds to the perception that books and libraries are fun.
The library has played an integral part in communities for decades and it will only continue to do so if parents and students make the library a big part of their lives.

More Posts Like This
  • Extrinsic Motivation Works (Until It Doesn’t): How to Cultivate Intrinsic Motivation

    Motivating students to perform can be a challenge. In times of struggle, tutors and parents will often choose the path of least resistance to help bring a child’s focus to the task at hand. It can be easy to settle for any port in a storm. Nevertheless, when these strategies rely on extrinsic rewards, they may be doing more harm than good. Praise, punishment, and bribery may be easy, low-hanging motivational fruit

    Read More
  • 7 Ways to Overcome Test Anxiety and Conquer Your Exams

    We all take tests that can cause stress - English, math, driver’s education or college entrance exams to name but a few. And what we find - regardless of subject or potential consequence - is that feeling prepared is the #1 tool in pushing back against test anxiety.

    Read More
  • Year-End Exams are Right Around the Corner: How to Prepare

    It’s soon time to plan for year-end exams. But before getting too wrapped up in the Periodic Table of Elements or quadratic equations, look at the big picture and strategize to score your best.

    Read More